Spaceflight Now



The Mission




Orbiter: Atlantis
Mission: STS-122
Payload: Columbus science laboratory
Launch: Feb. 7, 2008
Time: 2:45 p.m. EST
Site: Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
Landing: Feb. 20 @ 9:07 a.m. EST
Site: Shuttle Landing Facility, KSC


Mission Status Center

STS-122 Quick-Look

Meet the Crew

Launch Windows

Countdown Timeline

Launch Timeline

Master Flight Plan

Key Mission Personnel

Shuttle Flight History

STS-122 Archive




Spaceflight Now +



Subscribe to Spaceflight Now Plus for access to our extensive video collections!
How do I sign up?
Video archive

STS-122: The mission

Atlantis' trip to the station will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus science lab module.

 Play

STS-122: The programs

Managers from the shuttle, station and EVA programs discuss Atlantis' upcoming flight.

 Play

STS-122: Spacewalks

Three spacewalks are planned during Atlantis' STS-122 assembly mission. Lead spacewalk officer Anna Jarvis previews the EVAs.

 Full briefing
 EVA 1 summary
 EVA 2 summary
 EVA 3 summary

The Atlantis crew

The astronauts of Atlantis' STS-122 mission meet the press in the traditional pre-flight news conference.

 Play

Harmony's big move

The station's new Harmony module is detached from the Unity hub and moved to its permanent location on the Destiny lab.

 Play

Delta 4-Heavy launch

The first operational Delta 4-Heavy rocket launches the final Defense Support Program missile warning satellite for the Air Force.

 Full coverage

Columbus readied

The European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory module moves to pad 39A and placed aboard shuttle Atlantis for launch.

 To pad | Installed

Station port moved

The station crew uses the robot arm to detach the main shuttle docking port and mount it to the new Harmony module Nov. 12.

 Play

Atlantis rolls out

Space shuttle Atlantis rolls from the Vehicle Assembly Building to pad 39A for its December launch with the Columbus module.

 Play

Atlantis goes vertical

Atlantis is hoisted upright and maneuvered into position for attachment to the external tank and boosters.

 Play

Space station EVA

This Expedition 16 status briefing recaps the Nov. 9 spacewalk that prepared the station's shuttle docking port for relocation to the new Harmony module.

 Play

Become a subscriber
More video



Mission controllers release revised flight plan
BY WILLIAM HARWOOD
STORY WRITTEN FOR CBS NEWS "SPACE PLACE" & USED WITH PERMISSION
Posted: February 10, 2008

The Atlantis astronauts geared up for a hastily replanned day in space today, putting off their first spacewalk one day and instead focusing on equipment transfers to and from the space station and a robotic inspection of a protruding insulation blanket on one of the orbiter's aft rocket pods.

The spacewalk to prepare the European Space Agency's Columbus research module for attachment to the station was deferred one day because of an undisclosed medical problem with German astronaut Hans Schlegel. Schlegel trained to perform the first two of the mission's three spacewalks with astronaut Rex Walheim. Instead, he will be replaced on the first excursion by Stan Love, who already planned to join Walheim for the third EVA.

It is not yet known whether Schlegel will be allowed to carry out the second spacewalk, now set for Wednesday.

"Please forward to Hans all our best wishes," European mission control radioed today. "We're all keeping our fingers crossed for him to get better soon."

"Yes, Peter, I will do that for sure," newly arrived French astronaut Leopold Eyharts replied from the space station.

Other than saying the illness was not life threatening, NASA managers, citing medical privacy concerns, refused to provide any details about the nature or severity of the problem or even say which astronaut was involved. But when the astronauts were awakened today shortly after 4:45 a.m. by a German song beamed up for Schlegel from mission control in Houston, the 57-year-old father of seven was in good spirits.

"Good morning, Atlantis," astronaut Shannon Lucid called from Houston. "And a special good morning to you today, Hans."

"Good morning, Shannon. Good morning, everybody," Schlegel replied, sounding fit. "Thank you very much for this piece of music. It's a German song about the nature of man, it was selected by my dear wife, Heike. Greetings to everybody in America, in Europe and in Germany and especially, of course, to my close family and my lovely wife, Heike. Thank you very much, Shannon."

Commander Steve Frick chimed in later, saying "we're looking forward to a little different day than we expected, but it'll be a good day on orbit, it looks like."

"Copy that. We will have some more words for the day in a few minutes," said astronaut Kevin Ford in Houston. "Great job on the rendezvous yesterday. It was spectacular."

"We appreciate you guys getting us there," Frick said. "Boy, station's an amazing view, I'll tell you. It's not much like the sims, at least the view, but the vehicle flies beautifully and the training that ... the guys gave us really worked out well. It went very easily."

There are at least two prior cases of crew illness interfering with a U.S. spacewalk. During Apollo 9, a shakedown flight for NASA's lunar lander, Rusty Schweickart became ill in orbit, forcing a one-day delay for a planned spacewalk. An EVA planned for the fifth shuttle mission was delayed one day when astronaut Bill Lenoir became ill. The spacewalk ultimately was called off because of spacesuit problems.

Here is the revised summary timeline for today, flight day 4, in EST and mission elapsed time (includes rev. B of the NASA TV schedule):


EST........DD...HH...MM...EVENT

02/10/08
04:45 AM...02...14...00...STS/ISS crew wakeup
06:30 AM...02...15...45...ISS daily planning conference
07:00 AM...02...16...15...EVA-1: Procedures review (part 1)
09:00 AM...02...18...15...Eyharts Soyuz pressure suit leak check
09:45 AM...02...19...00...Logistics transfers
10:00 AM...02...19...15...Spacesuit swap
10:20 AM...02...19...35...EVA-1: Airlock preparations
11:00 AM...02...20...15...Shuttle crew joint meal
12:00 PM...02...21...15...Shuttle crew off duty
01:20 PM...02...22...35...Harmony vestibule outfitting preps for Columbus
02:15 PM...02...23...30...Focused inspection of protruding insulation blanket
03:00 PM...03...00...15...Mission status briefing on NTV
03:45 PM...03...01...00...EVA-1: Procedures review (part 2)
04:00 PM...03...02...00...Post-MMT briefing on NTV
04:45 PM...03...02...00...External tank umbilical camera downlink
05:25 PM...03...02...40...Wing leading edge/nose cap laser scan downlink
07:00 PM...03...04...15...EVA-1: Airlock campout
08:15 PM...03...05...30...ISS crew sleep begins
08:45 PM...03...06...00...STS crew sleep begins
09:00 PM...03...06...15...Daily video highlights reel on NTV

"We've had to replan the activities for today," station Flight Director Ron Spencer explained early today. "As you know, the (priorities) of this mission are the Columbus installation and activation. However, we do have a fair amount of activities that don't require Columbus. With every space shuttle mission, it's kind of like a moving van coming to your house and so there's quite a bit of activity spread throughout the mission to transfer new parts and science payloads over to the space station and to take the broken parts and science return back home on the shuttle.

"So, one of the main things we've scheduled for the crew to do today instead of the EVA is to go ahead and do a lot of that transfer of equipment from the shuttle over to the station and vice versa. Also on this mission, we're having a crew exchange (with Eyharts replacing Dan Tani) and so there's a lot of time we dedicate throughout the mission for the crew to do handover between the departing crew member and the arriving crew member so that they know where things are stowed, how things really work ... and pretty much a familiarization with their new home. So we've scheduled a lot of time for that today as well. And this will help us as the mission goes on to free up time once Columbus is installed, to devote most of the crew time toward Columbus."

Spencer said four hours has been blocked out for Love to review the plan for Monday's spacewalk. He and Walheim will spend the night in the space station's airlock at reduced pressure to help purge nitrogen from their bloodstreams before working in NASA's low-pressure spacesuits.

"We've given him four hours of time to study the EVA timeline since he was not originally scheduled to do this EVA," Spencer said. "He is familiar with the station ... so this won't be completely new to him. But since he wasn't trained for this specific task, we've given him four hours of time to study the plan and have Hans available for question and answer, as well as the other crew members who were going to be involved with the EVA."

Later today, the astronauts will use cameras on a robot arm to inspect the shuttle's aft right orbital maneuvering system rocket pod where image analysts spotted a corner of one insulation blanket that has pulled up slightly along a seam.

NASA normally sets time aside on the fifth day of a shuttle mission to carry out a so-called focused inspection, but given the spacewalk delay, the work was added to today's schedule. The protruding blanket does not appear to be a serious issue, but "we don't know if the blanket's torn or if it's just protruding right there," Spencer said. "So we've dedicated some time to take more detailed images of that."

Spaceflight Now Plus
Additional coverage for subscribers:
VIDEO: SHUTTLE ATLANTIS DOCKS TO SPACE STATION PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS PERFORMS THE 360-DEGREE BACKFLIP PLAY
VIDEO: VIEWS OF THE SHUTTLE APPROACHING FROM BELOW PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS COMPLETES THE "TI" BURN PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED PREVIEW OF THE DOCKING PLAY
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 2 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY | XL SIZE
VIDEO: FRIDAY'S MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: HEAT SHIELD INSPECTIONS EXPLAINED PLAY

VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-1 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-2 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA CS-6 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: WEST TOWER PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: FRONT CAMERA PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 009 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 049 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 050 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 051 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 054 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 060 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 070 PLAY
VIDEO: LAUNCH REPLAY: CAMERA 071 PLAY

VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 1 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY | XL SIZE
VIDEO: NARRATED REVIEW OF ATLANTIS' LAUNCH PREPS PLAY | XL SIZE
VIDEO: NASA AND ESA POST-LAUNCH NEWS BRIEFING PLAY

VIDEO: FULL LENGTH LAUNCH MOVIE! PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS BLASTS OFF WITH COLUMBUS PLAY
VIDEO: POLLS GIVE THE FINAL "GO" TO LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS ARRIVE AT LAUNCH PAD 39A PLAY
VIDEO: CREW DEPARTS QUARTERS FOR LAUNCH PAD PLAY
VIDEO: ASTRONAUTS DON THEIR SPACESUITS FOR LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: RUSSIAN CARGO SHIP DOCKS TO STATION THIS MORNING PLAY
VIDEO: PAD GANTRY ROLLED BACK THE NIGHT BEFORE LAUNCH PLAY

VIDEO: COLUMBUS AND ATV OVERVIEW BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE PLAY
VIDEO: TUESDAY MORNING'S COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: MONDAY'S CARGO SHIP UNDOCKING FROM STATION PLAY
VIDEO: ATLANTIS' PAYLOAD BAY DOORS CLOSED FOR FLIGHT PLAY
VIDEO: CREW RETURNS TO KENNEDY SPACE CENTER FOR LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: MONDAY MORNING'S COUNTDOWN STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: POST-FLIGHT READINESS REVIEW BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: STS-122 ASTRONAUT BIOGRAPHIES PLAY
VIDEO: NARRATED OVERVIEW OF ATLANTIS' MISSION PLAY
VIDEO: INSIGHTS INTO COLUMBUS SCIENCE LABORATORY PLAY
VIDEO: STS-122 MISSION OVERVIEW BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: BRIEFING ON THE SPACEWALKS PLAY
VIDEO: CREW'S PRE-FLIGHT BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH STEVE FRICK PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH ALAN POINDEXTER PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH LELAND MELVIN PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH REX WALHEIM PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH HANS SCHLEGEL PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH STANLEY LOVE PLAY
VIDEO: CREW INTERVIEW WITH LEOPOLD EYHARTS PLAY
MORE: STS-122 VIDEO COVERAGE
SUBSCRIBE NOW

John Glenn Mission Patch

Free shipping to U.S. addresses!

The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.
 U.S. STORE
 WORLDWIDE STORE

Final Shuttle Mission Patch

Free shipping to U.S. addresses!

The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!
 U.S. STORE
 WORLDWIDE STORE

Celebrate the shuttle program

Free shipping to U.S. addresses!

This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!
 U.S. STORE
 WORLDWIDE STORE

Anniversary Shuttle Patch

Free shipping to U.S. addresses!

This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.
 U.S. STORE
 WORLDWIDE STORE

Mercury anniversary

Free shipping to U.S. addresses!


Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.
 U.S. STORE
 WORLDWIDE STORE

Fallen Heroes Patch Collection
The official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store.
 U.S. STORE
 WORLDWIDE STORE

INDEX | PLUS | NEWS ARCHIVE | LAUNCH SCHEDULE
ASTRONOMY NOW | STORE

ADVERTISE

© 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.