Spaceflight Now



The Mission




Orbiter: Endeavour
Mission: STS-118
Launch: Aug. 8, 2007
Time: 6:36 p.m. EDT
Site: Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Florida
Landing: Aug. 21 @ 12:32 p.m. EDT
Site: Shuttle Landing Facility, KSC
Mission Status Center

Daily Timeline

Docking Timeline

STS-118 Quick-Look

NASA TV Schedule

Launch Windows Chart

Countdown Timeline

Launch Timeline

Launch Ascent Data

Master Flight Plan

Key Mission Personnel

Shuttle Flight History

STS-117 Archive

STS-116 Archive

STS-115 Archive

STS-121 Archive

STS-114 Archive



The Crew




Meet the seven astronauts flying aboard Endeavour's STS-118 mission.

Meet the Crew

CDR: Scott Kelly

PLT: Charlie Hobaugh

MS 1: Tracy Caldwell

MS 2: Rick Mastracchio

MS 3: Dave Williams

MS 4: Barbara Morgan

MS 5: Al Drew

Manned Spaceflights

Current Demographics





BY JUSTIN RAY

Welcome to our complete live coverage of the space shuttle Endeavour's mission to the International Space Station. Reload this page for the latest updates.

Spaceflight Now Plus
Additional coverage for subscribers:
VIDEO: CREW GIVEN THE "GO" FOR DEORBIT BURN PLAY
VIDEO: SHUTTLE ENDEAVOUR'S LANDING AS SEEN LIVE PLAY
VIDEO: LANDING REPLAY: CAMERA LOOKING OUT PILOT'S WINDOW PLAY
VIDEO: LANDING REPLAY: WIDESCREEN TRACKER PLAY
VIDEO: LANDING REPLAY: VAB ROOF CAMERA PLAY
VIDEO: LANDING REPLAY: RUNWAY NORTH PLAY
VIDEO: LANDING REPLAY: RUNWAY WEST PLAY
VIDEO: LANDING REPLAY: MID-FIELD PLAY
VIDEO: LANDING REPLAY: RUNWAY EAST PLAY
VIDEO: POST-LANDING NEWS CONFERENCE PLAY
VIDEO: CREW'S POST-FLIGHT NEWS CONFERENCE PLAY

VIDEO: MISSION RECAP FROM PROGRAM MANAGERS PLAY
VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 13 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 13 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: EDUCATIONAL EVENT WITH CANADIAN STUDENTS PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 12 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 12 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: ENDEAVOUR UNDOCKS FROM THE SPACE STATION PLAY

VIDEO: THE FLIGHT DAY 11 HIGHLIGHTS MOVIE PLAY
VIDEO: FLIGHT DAY 11 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING PLAY
VIDEO: FAREWELL CEREMONY BETWEEN THE CREWS PLAY
VIDEO: SPACE STATION FLIES OVER HURRICANE DEAN PLAY
VIDEO: ANTENNAS INSTALLED BY THE SPACEWALKERS PLAY
VIDEO: EXTERNAL EXPERIMENT PACKAGES RETRIEVED PLAY
VIDEO: FOURTH AND FINAL SPACEWALK BEGINS PLAY

VIDEO: CREW MODULE CAMERA SHOWS FIRST MINUTES OF LAUNCH PLAY
VIDEO: CREW MODULE CAMERA SHOWS ARRIVAL IN SPACE PLAY
VIDEO: LEFT-HAND BOOSTER LOOKING UP PLAY
VIDEO: LEFT-HAND BOOSTER LOOKING DOWN PLAY
VIDEO: RIGHT-HAND BOOSTER LOOKING UP PLAY
VIDEO: RIGHT-HAND BOOSTER LOOKING DOWN PLAY
VIDEO: THE EXTERNAL FUEL TANK'S CAMERA PLAY
MORE: STS-118 VIDEO COVERAGE
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TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2007

Our gallery of landing photos is posted here.

1800 GMT (2:00 p.m. EDT)

Six of the astronauts, except for Barbara Morgan, exited the Crew Transport Vehicle to chat with the officials and VIPs waiting on the runway and to get an upclose look at their spaceship.

The astronauts will be heading for crew quarters to be reunited with their family members and have some dinner. They will be flying back to Houston tomorrow.

Endeavour is scheduled to be towed off the runway later this afternoon. The shuttle will be taken to its Orbiter Processing Facility hangar bay to begin preparations for the STS-123 mission set for launch next February.

1747 GMT (1:47 p.m. EDT)

The Crew Transport Vehicle carrying the astronauts is driving back from the shuttle. Some of the crew is expected to take the traditional walkaround of Endeavour to inspect the ship on the runway. There to welcome them is NASA Administrator Mike Griffin and other senior officials.

1727 GMT (1:27 p.m. EDT)

Falling back to Earth, the shuttle Endeavour streaked across Central America and high above Cuba today before gliding up the length of the Florida peninsula to a sunny landing at the Kennedy Space Center to close out a dramatic two-week space station assembly mission.

Read our landing story.

1723 GMT (1:23 p.m. EDT)

All seven astronauts have egressed the orbiter. They are inside the Crew Transport Vehicle now.

1700 GMT (1:00 p.m. EDT)

The Crew Transport Vehicle -- a modified airport "People Mover" -- is pulled up to the side hatch for the astronauts to enter. The CTV features beds and comfortable seats for the astronauts to receive medical checks after returning to Earth's gravity from the weightless environment of space.

1649 GMT (12:49 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour's three Auxiliary Power Units have been shut down.

1648 GMT (12:48 p.m. EDT)

The crew has been given a "go" to climb out of their entry spacesuits.

1647 GMT (12:47 p.m. EDT)

The main engine nozzles have been repositioned, or gimbaled, to the "rain drain" orientation.

1645 GMT (12:45 p.m. EDT)

On the runway, technicians are using instruments to "sniff" the shuttle's exterior to check for any hazardous vapors.

1644 GMT (12:44 p.m. EDT)

Here are the landing times in Eastern Daylight Time and Mission Elapsed Time:

Main Gear Touchdown
12:32:16 p.m. EDT
MET: 12 days, 17 hours, 55 minutes, 34 seconds

Nose Gear Touchdown
12:32:29 p.m. EDT
MET: 12 days, 17 hours, 55 minutes, 47 seconds

Wheels Stop
12:33:20 p.m. EDT
MET: 12 days, 17 hours, 56 minutes, 38 seconds

1642 GMT (12:42 p.m. EDT)

The drag chute, landing gear and side hatch pyrotechnics have been safed.

1637 GMT (12:37 p.m. EDT)

The external tank umbilical doors on the shuttle's belly are being opened.

1635 GMT (12:35 p.m. EDT)

The crew is beginning the post-landing procedures on Endeavour.

1633 GMT (12:33 p.m. EDT)

WHEEL STOP. Endeavour has rolled to a stop after traveling more than 200 orbits of Earth and five million miles.

1632 GMT (12:32 p.m. EDT)

TOUCHDOWN! Main gear touchdown. Nose gear touchdown. And drag chute deploy for Endeavour as the shuttle returns home to complete its 20th spaceflight.

1632 GMT (12:32 p.m. EDT)

Landing gear is coming down. Standing by for touchdown on Runway 15.

1631 GMT (12:31 p.m. EDT)

Wings are level. Altitude 5,000 feet.

1631 GMT (12:31 p.m. EDT)

Altitude 10,000 feet. The shuttle descending at a rate seven times steeper than that of a commercial airliner.

1630 GMT (12:30 p.m. EDT)

Field in sight. Commander Scott Kelly reports he can see the runway as he guides Endeavour to landing.

1630 GMT (12:30 p.m. EDT)

Altitude 17,000 feet as Endeavour continues in the sweeping turn.

1629 GMT (12:29 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour is traveling 23,000 feet in altitude at 275 knots.

1629 GMT (12:29 p.m. EDT)

The shuttle is in the Heading Alignment Cylinder, an imaginary circle to align with Runway 15. Commander Scott Kelly is piloting Endeavour through a 210-degree left-overhead turn over the Atlantic to loop around for landing on the northwest to southeast runway.

1628 GMT (12:28 p.m. EDT)

Very loud twin sonic booms have rumbled across the Kennedy Space Center area, announcing the shuttle's arrival.

1628 GMT (12:28 p.m. EDT)

Now descending through 50,000 feet.

1627 GMT (12:27 p.m. EDT)

The crew has been given the "go" for late deployment of the drag chute after nose gear touchdown as part of a crosswind handling test.

1626 GMT (12:26 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour is 82,000 feet in altitude at 1,600 mph. Ground tracking cameras have a good view of the shuttle already.

1625 GMT (12:25 p.m. EDT)

Seven minutes to touchdown. Air data probes are being deployed from the shuttle's nose to feed air speed, altitude and angle of attack information to the computers for navigation.

1624 GMT (12:24 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour is traveling 105,000 feet in altitude at 2,600 mph.

1622 GMT (12:22 p.m. EDT)

Ten minutes from landing. Endeavour is over South Florida now.

1622 GMT (12:22 p.m. EDT)

The vehicle is on course and the MILA tracking station at the Cape has acquired Endeavour's signal.

1621 GMT (12:21 p.m. EDT)

Now 11 minutes from touchdown. Mission Control computes Endeavour will land 1,800 feet down the runway at 205 knots.

1620 GMT (12:20 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour is 460 miles from the runway.

1619 GMT (12:19 p.m. EDT)

The shuttle is passing over Cuba at an altitude of 170,000 feet.

1618 GMT (12:18 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour is now 178,000 feet in altitude, traveling at 8,900 mph.

1616 GMT (12:16 p.m. EDT)

The vehicle is now out over the Caribbean, some 16 minutes to touchdown.

1615 GMT (12:15 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour has made landfall over Central America at an altitude of 214,000 feet and a speed of 13,100 mph. The shuttle will continue over the Caribbean before crossing Cuba and arriving the skies above South Florida bound for Kennedy Space Center.

1612 GMT (12:12 p.m. EDT)

Twenty minutes to go. Endeavour is 226,000 feet up, traveling at 14,400 mph.

1611 GMT (12:11 p.m. EDT)

The shuttle just crossed the equator off the west coast of South America.

1610 GMT (12:10 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour's altitude is 236,000 feet and the speed is now 15,500 mph.

1608 GMT (12:08 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour descending through an altitude of 248,000 feet at a speed of 16,400 mph.

1607 GMT (12:07 p.m. EDT)

Time to touchdown now 25 minutes. NASA says Endeavour's landing weight will be 222,398 pounds. That is 46,176 pounds lighter than the orbiter weighed at liftoff.

1606 GMT (12:06 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour is beginning the first of four banks to scrub off speed as it plunges into the atmosphere. These turns basically remove the energy Endeavour built up during launch.

1604 GMT (12:04 p.m. EDT)

Endeavour is 296,000 feet above the South Pacific, traveling at 17,000 mph.

1602 GMT (12:02 p.m. EDT)

Now 30 minutes from touchdown. Endeavour's track to landing is illustrated here.

1600 GMT (12:00 p.m. EDT)

ENTRY INTERFACE. Endeavour's thermal protection system is feeling heat beginning to build as the orbiter enters the top fringes of the atmosphere -- a period known as entry interface.

The shuttle is flying at Mach 25 with its nose elevated 40 degrees, wings level, at an altitude of 400,000 feet over the southern Pacific Ocean.

Touchdown remains set for 11:32 a.m. EDT in Florida.

1557 GMT (11:57 a.m. EDT)

Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility was built in 1975. The concrete strip is 300 feet wide and 15,000 feet long with 1,000-foot overruns at each end. The runway is located about three miles northwest of the 525-foot tall Vehicle Assembly Building.

Endeavour is targeting Runway 15, which is the northwest to southeast approach. The shuttle will make a 210-degree left overhead turn to align with the runway.

1553 GMT (11:53 a.m. EDT)

All three Auxiliary Power Units are running now.

1552 GMT (11:52 a.m. EDT)

Now 40 minutes to touchdown. Onboard guidance has maneuvered Endeavour from its heads-down, tail-forward position needed for the deorbit burn to the reentry configuration of heads-up and nose-forward. The nose will be pitched upward 40 degrees. In this new position, the black tiles on the shuttle's belly and the reinforced carbon-carbon panels on the wing leading edges and nose cap will shield the spacecraft during the fiery plunge through the Earth's atmosphere with temperatures reaching well over 2,000 degrees F. Endeavour will begin interacting with the upper fringes of the atmosphere above the South Pacific at 11:00 a.m. EDT.

1545 GMT (11:45 a.m. EDT)

The propellant dump has been completed.

1542 GMT (11:42 a.m. EDT)

Touchdown is 50 minutes away. This will be the 65th shuttle landing at Kennedy Space Center.

1541 GMT (11:41 a.m. EDT)

The convoy of landing support vehicles is moving to runway staging point for receiving Endeavour.

1537 GMT (11:37 a.m. EDT)

Endeavour is now 210 miles over Australia.

1535 GMT (11:35 a.m. EDT)

Excess propellant reserves in the maneuvering thrusters on the shuttle's nose will be dumped overboard. The dump time will be 57 seconds.

1532 GMT (11:32 a.m. EDT)

Sixty minutes to touchdown. Endeavour is now maneuvering to the orientation for entry.

1529 GMT (11:29 a.m. EDT)

DEORBIT BURN COMPLETE. Endeavour has successfully completed the deorbit burn for the trip back home. Landing is scheduled for 12:32 p.m. EDT at the Cape to complete this two-week space station assembly mission.

1525 GMT (11:25 a.m. EDT)

DEORBIT BURN IGNITION. Flying upside down and backwards above the Indian Ocean, Endeavour has begun the deorbit burn. The firing of the twin Orbital Maneuvering System engines on the tail of the shuttle will last three-and-a-half minutes, slowing the craft by about 250 mph to slip from orbit. The retro-burn will send Endeavour to Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a touchdown at 12:32 p.m. EDT.

1523 GMT (11:23 a.m. EDT)

Endeavour is in the proper orientation and systems are configured for the deorbit burn.

1520 GMT (11:20 a.m. EDT)

Pilot Charlie Hobaugh is activating one of three Auxiliary Power Units in advance of the burn, now five minutes away. The other two APUs will be started later in the descent to provide pressure needed to power shuttle's hydraulic systems that move the wing flaps, rudder/speed brake, drop the landing gear and steer the nose wheel. NASA ensures that at least one APU is working before committing to the deorbit burn since the shuttle needs only a single unit to make a safe landing.

1507 GMT (11:07 a.m. EDT)

GO FOR THE DEORBIT BURN! Weather is declared observed and forecast "go" at Kennedy Space Center. So entry flight director Steve Stich in Mission Control just gave the "go" for Endeavour to perform the deorbit burn at 11:25 a.m. EDT that will commit the shuttle for the trip back to Earth.

Touchdown in Florida is set for 12:32 p.m. EDT.

1455 GMT (10:55 a.m. EDT)

Now 30 minutes until the deorbit burn. Standing by for a "go" or "no go" call from Mission Control based on weather.

1448 GMT (10:48 a.m. EDT)

Pilot Charlie Hobaugh has put the Auxiliary Power Units cockpit switches in the ready-to-start configuration.

1446 GMT (10:46 a.m. EDT)

A steering check of the Endeavour's twin orbital maneuvering system engines on the tail of the shuttle is being performed. The engines will perform the deorbit burn to slow the ship for entry into the atmosphere today.

1436 GMT (10:36 a.m. EDT)

There is another shower to the east of the runway that meteorologists are watching. The crosswinds have not developed today, so that's no longer a real concern. Flight controllers are discussing the option of switching runways, however.

1411 GMT (10:11 a.m. EDT)

The weather outlook is still optimistic. The crew has been given a "go" to start the "fluid loading" protocol. That involves drinking large amounts of liquids and salt tablets to assist in the readaptation to Earth's gravity.

1346 GMT (9:46 a.m. EDT)

Chief NASA astronaut Steve Lindsey just took off from the KSC runway aboard the Shuttle Training Aircraft for weather reconnaissance flights around the Cape area.

There is one shower to the south but it's not much of a concern, winds remain within limits and the clouds are scattering out.

"There's a pretty nice blue sky waiting for ya," CAPCOM astronaut Chris Ferguson just told the crew.

1332 GMT (9:32 a.m. EDT)

Now three hours from touchdown at the Kennedy Space Center.

1309 GMT (9:09 a.m. EDT)

Endeavour is crossing the equator to begin orbit 200 of the mission. Weather is still looking good for an on-time landing today.

"It looks like a nice day to land," CAPCOM astronaut Chris Ferguson just told the crew.

1254 GMT (8:54 a.m. EDT)

Endeavour's 60-foot-long payload bay doors are now closed and locked in preparation for today's fiery descent into Earth's atmosphere and landing at Kennedy Space Center, with touchdown at 12:32 p.m. EDT.

Mission Control has given the crew a "go" to transition the onboard computers from the OPS-2 software used during the shuttle's stay in space to OPS-3, which is the software package that governs entry and landing.

1241 GMT (8:41 a.m. EDT)

The "go" has been radioed to the crew for payload bay door closing.

1230 GMT (8:30 a.m. EDT)

Mission Control has given the crew a "go" to configure the orbiter for closing the payload bay doors. Cooling is being switched from the radiators in the doors to the flash evaporator system that uses water stored on the shuttle to keep onboard systems from overheating.

The weather outlook for today's first landing opportunity is looking favorable for Endeavour's return to Earth. The deorbit burn to brake from orbit would occur at 11:25 a.m. EDT, leading to touchdown on Runway 15 at 12:32 p.m. EDT. Meteorologists are predicting just a few clouds at 3,000 feet, seven miles of visibility and easterly winds from 100 degrees at 10 peaking to 17 knots. That equates to a crosswind of 14 knots, just within the 15-knot limit for landing.

The backup landing opportunity one orbit later -- deorbiting at 1:00 p.m. and touching down at 2:06 p.m. -- is a bit questionable because of crosswinds. The landing time forecast calls for scattered clouds at 2,500 feet, seven miles of visibility and easterly winds still at 10 peaking to 17 knots but from 080 degrees, making the crosswind component some 16 knots.

1035 GMT (6:35 a.m. EDT)

The Endeavour astronauts are working through a busy re-entry day timeline this morning, preparing the shuttle for landing at the Kennedy Space Center to close out a two-week space station assembly mission. Generally favorable weather is expected, but crosswinds at the shuttle runway could be close to NASA's 15-knot limit.

Appropriately enough, commander Scott Kelly, pilot Charles Hobaugh, Tracy Caldwell, Rick Mastracchio, Dave Williams, Barbara Morgan and Al Drew were awakened at 4:36 a.m. by a recording of Simon and Garfunkle's "Homeward Bound" beamed up from mission control.

"Good morning, Endeavour," astronaut Shannon Lucid radioed from Houston. "And the music this morning was sent to all of you by all of your families in anticipation of a happy landing day."

"Well that's very nice of them to think of that, Shannon," Kelly replied. "Although it's been a short two weeks, we've accomplished a lot and we still look very much forward to coming home today. Thanks."

The deorbit timeline begins at 7:25 and barring a turn for the worse with the weather, the crew will activate internal cooling and close Endeavour's cargo bay doors at 8:45 a.m.

Read our full story.

MONDAY, AUGUST 20, 2007

Space shuttle Endeavour is scheduled for landing at Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday, weather permitting, to close out its action-packed space station assembly flight. Program managers say a small-but-deep gouge in the shuttle's heat shield poses no threat to Endeavour or its crew. But the jury is still out on what sort of near-term fix might be needed to keep shuttles flying until the external tank problem that caused the damage can be eliminated.

Read our full story.

1200 GMT (8:00 a.m. EDT)

The Endeavour astronauts are preparing the shuttle for landing Tuesday, packing up equipment and testing the ship's re-entry systems before enjoying a final few hours of off-duty time this afternoon.

Read our full story.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2007

The Endeavour astronauts undocked from the international space station today and carried out a final inspection of the shuttle's carbon composite nose cap and wing leading edge panels to make sure the ship is ready for re-entry and landing Tuesday to close out a dramatic station assembly mission.

Read our full story.

1930 GMT (3:30 p.m. EDT)

The inspections have been completed and the boom returned to its cradle in the payload bay. Data downlink to analysts on the ground will be continuing into the late afternoon.

1730 GMT (1:30 p.m. EDT)

Observations of the port wing are underway aboard shuttle Endeavour. This is the third and final part of the inspections for today.

We have posted the ground tracks for the two Kennedy Space Center landing opportunities on Tuesday. The first track would lead to touchdown on Runway 15 at 12:32 p.m. EDT. The second track an orbit later would see a touchdown at 2:06 p.m. EDT.

1605 GMT (12:05 p.m. EDT)

The right wing has been scanned using the laser and camera package of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System. The crew is swinging the boom in position to inspect Endeavour's nose cap next.

1440 GMT (10:40 a.m. EDT)

Inspections of the leading edge panels on the starboard wing have begun.

1400 GMT (10:00 a.m. EDT)

The Endeavour astronauts have pulled the Orbiter Boom Sensor System out of the payload bay using the shuttle's robot arm for a series of heat shield inspections. The inspections are similar to the ones performed the day after launch. Today's survey results will be compared with the earlier data to ensure the orbiter's wing leading edge panels and nose cap are free of any space debris impacts that could have occurred during the mission.

1248 GMT (8:48 a.m. EDT)

The shuttle is quickly departing the vicinity of the space station following separation burn No. 2.

The Endeavour crew will perform another series of heat shield inspections today, then spend tomorrow packing up the cabin and testing the vehicle's flight controls for landing. The deorbit burn to begin reentry is scheduled for 11:25 a.m. EDT Tuesday, leading to touchdown on Kennedy Space Center's three-mile concrete runway at 12:32 p.m. EDT.

1240 GMT (8:40 a.m. EDT)

Endeavour has moved 2,300 feet over the station.

1230 GMT (8:30 a.m. EDT)

Distance between the two spacecraft is now 840 feet.

1221 GMT (8:21 a.m. EDT)

Endeavour is about 400 feet out in front of the space station now. Separation burn No. 1 has occurred. This four-second pulse by the shuttle's steering jets is sending Endeavour up above the station were the second separation maneuver will be performed later this hour.

There will be no flyaround of the station today because of the crew's compressed timeline. Heat shield inspections will be getting underway later this morning.

1206 GMT (8:06 a.m. EDT)

Endeavour is now 121 feet from the station, backing away at about 0.2 feet per second. The shuttle is headed to a point about 400 feet away where it will fire thrusters to begin an arc above the station.

1156 GMT (7:56 a.m. EDT)

UNDOCKING! After nearly nine days of combined operations high above Earth, shuttle Endeavour is departing the space station for return to Earth. The shuttle continued construction of the orbiting complex by delivering the Starboard 5 truss structure, an external spare parts platform and a couple tons of supplies.

The undocking is occurring 214 miles over the South Pacific.

Endeavour is due home at the Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday, with touchdown targeted for about 12:30 p.m. EDT.

Here is a look at the landing options for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida (KSC), Edwards Air Force Base in California (EDW) and White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico (NOR). All times are EDT:

ORBIT.SITE..DEORBIT....LAND

08/21/07

201...KSC...11:25 AM...12:32 AM
202...KSC...01:00 PM...02:06 PM
203...EDW...02:30 PM...03:37 PM
......NOR...02:31 PM...03:38 PM
204...EDW...04:06 PM...05:11 PM
......NOR...04:09 PM...05:13 PM
205...EDW...05:43 PM...06:48 PM

08/22/07

217...KSC...11:52 AM...12:54 AM
218...NOR...01:24 PM...02:26 PM
......KSC...01:27 PM...02:29 PM
219...EDW...02:57 PM...03:59 PM
......NOR...02:59 PM...04:01 PM
220...EDW...04:33 PM...05:35 PM

08/23/07

232...KSC...10:40 AM...11:42 AM
233...KSC...12:15 PM...01:17 PM
234...EDW...01:45 PM...02:47 PM
......NOR...01:47 PM...02:48 PM
235...EDW...03:20 PM...04:22 PM
......NOR...03:23 PM...04:24 PM
236...EDW...04:57 PM...05:58 PM

1152 GMT (7:52 a.m. EDT)

Five minutes from undocking. The steering jets on Endeavour are inhibited for the period of physical undocking from the station. The separation occurs when large springs push the two craft apart. Once the shuttle is a couple feet away from the station and the docking devices are clear of one another, pilot Charlie Hobaugh will fire Endeavour's thrusters to continue the movement away.

1140 GMT (7:40 a.m. EDT)

All is in readiness for space shuttle Endeavour's undocking from the station. The final "go" has been given to the crew from Mission Control.

1030 GMT (6:30 a.m. EDT)

The Endeavour astronauts are preparing to undock from the international space station today after a busy, at times dramatic, nine days of orbital construction and supply transfer work. Hatches between the two spacecraft were closed Saturday and if all goes well, the shuttle will undock around 7:57 a.m.

Because the crew has had only a few hours of off-duty time since the mission began, flight controllers designed a straight-forward fly away, eliminating a slow loop around the station for photo documentation to give the astronauts a few more hours off at the end of the day. The second of two rocket firings at 8:54 a.m. will complete the undocking and separation procedure.

Read our full story.

Read our earlier status center coverage.



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