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Next Delta 4 rolls out
The Boeing Delta 4 rocket to launch the next GOES geostationary U.S. weather satellite is rolled to Cape Canaveral's pad 37B for its spring blastoff. (2min 08sec file)
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Rocket goes vertical
The pad erector arm lifts the Delta 4 rocket upright, standing the vehicle onto the launch table. (4min 00sec file)
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Checking their ride
The STS-114 return-to-flight space shuttle astronauts inspect Discovery's thermal tiles and wing leading edge panels during the Crew Equipment Interface Test activities at Kennedy Space Center. (2min 26sec file)
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In the payload bay
The astronauts don coveralls and go into space shuttle Discovery's payload bay for further examinations during the Crew Equipment Interface Test in the orbiter hangar. (1min 25sec file)
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Shuttle simulation
A long mission simulation is underway to rehearse the launch of space shuttle Discovery, the uncovering of impact damage and the decision-making process of the flight controllers and management team. (14min 31sec file)

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Space rendezvous
After a two-day journey from Baikonur Cosmodrome, the Russian Progress 17P mission and International Space Station rendezvous in Earth orbit. Cameras on both craft provide scenes in this highlights movie. (4min 02sec file)
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Station flyaround
The Progress vehicle performs an automated flyaround of the International Space Station to align with the docking port. (3min 42sec file)
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ISS cargo ship docking
The Russian Progress M-52 resupply ship docks to the International Space Station as seen by the nose-mounted camera on the delivery freighter. (1min 30sec file)
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Approach and docking
This extended length clip shows the Russian Progress cargo ship's final approach and docking to the International Space Station. (10min 00sec file)
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Shuttle tank mating
The external tank for the return-to-flight space shuttle mission is moved into position and mated with the twin solid rockets boosters at Kennedy Space Center. (4min 30sec file)
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Cassini update
Go inside the Cassini-Huygens mission to explore Saturn, its rings and moons with this lecture from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (81min 05sec file)

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Shuttle testing
Testing to support the space shuttle return to flight is being performed at NASA's Ames Research Center. This footage shows wind tunnel testing using a shuttle mockup and thermal protection system tests in the arc jet facility. (5min 02sec file)
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Early universe looks like 'vegetable soup'
HARVARD-SMITHSONIAN CENTER FOR ASTROPHYSICS NEWS RELEASE
Posted: March 11, 2005

What did the universe look like when it was only 2 to 3 billion years old? Astronomers used to think it was a pretty simple place containing relatively small, young star-forming galaxies. Researchers now are realizing that the truth is not that simple. Even the early universe was a wildly complex place. Studying the universe at this early stage is important in understanding how the galaxies near us were assembled over time.


This artist's concept shows a warm, watery alien world in the early universe whose sky is filled with a variety of galaxies. Spitzer data showed that the early universe was a big zoo with "animals" of all sorts, including surprisingly old, dead galaxies that stopped forming stars very quickly. Credit: David A. Aguilar (CfA)
 
Jiasheng Huang (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) said, "It looks like vegetable soup! We're detecting galaxies we never expected to find, having a wide range of properties we never expected to see."

"It's becoming more and more clear that the young universe was a big zoo with animals of all sorts," said Ivo Labbé (Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington), lead author on the study announcing this result.

Using the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) aboard NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, the astronomers searched for distant, red galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field South-a region of the southern sky previously observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Their search was successful. The IRAC images displayed about a dozen very red galaxies lurking at distances of 10 to 12 billion light-years. Those galaxies existed when the universe was only about 1/5 of its present age of 14 billion years. Analysis showed that the galaxies exhibit a large range of properties.

"Overall, we're seeing young galaxies with lots of dust, young galaxies with no dust, old galaxies with lots of dust, and old galaxies with no dust. There's as much variety in the early universe as we see around us today," said Labbé.

The team was particularly surprised to find a curious breed of galaxy never seen before at such an early stage in the universe-old, red galaxies that had stopped forming new stars altogether. Those galaxies had rapidly formed large numbers of stars much earlier in the universe's history, raising the question of what caused them to "die" so soon.

The unpredicted existence of such "red and dead" galaxies so early in time challenges theorists who model galaxy formation.

"We're trying to understand how galaxies like the Milky Way assembled and how they got to look the way they appear today," said Giovanni Fazio (CfA), a co-author on the study. "Spitzer offers capabilities that Hubble and other instruments don't, giving us a unique way to study very distant galaxies that eventually became the galaxies we see around us now."

The study will be published in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

This press release is being issued in conjunction with the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Science operations are conducted at the Spitzer Science Center, Pasadena, Calif. JPL is a division of California Institute for Technology, Pasadena.

Headquartered in Cambridge, Mass., the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) is a joint collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Harvard College Observatory. CfA scientists, organized into six research divisions, study the origin, evolution and ultimate fate of the universe.

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Apollo 12 tribute DVD set

New! Featuring the jovial crew of Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon and Alan Bean, the Apollo 12 mission was struck by lightning shortly after liftoff but proceeded on the second successful exploration voyage to the lunar surface. This three-disc DVD brings the mission to life with extraordinary detail.
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Fallen Heroes special patch
This special 12-inch embroidered patch commemorates the U.S. astronauts who made the ultimate sacrifice, honoring the crews of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia.
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Women in Space
Women of Space: Cool Careers on the Final Frontier is for girls, young women, and anyone else interested in learning about exciting careers in space exploration. Includes CD-ROM.
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Mars rover poster
This new poster features some of the best pictures from NASA's amazing Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity.
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Gemini 12
Gemini 12: The NASA Mission Reports covers the voyage of James Lovell and Buzz Aldrin that capped the Gemini program's efforts to prove the technologies and techniques that would be needed for the Apollo Moon landings. Includes CD-ROM.
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